Urology Annals
About UA | Search | Ahead of print | Current Issue | Archives | Instructions | Online submissionLogin 
Urology Annals
  Editorial Board | Subscribe | Advertise | Contact
Users Online: 216   Home Print this page  Email this page Small font size Default font size Increase font size


 
Table of Contents
COMMENTARY
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 98  

Interposition flaps in vesicovaginal fistula repairs can optimize cure rate


Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, Director Voiding Dysfunction and Female Urology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio

Date of Web Publication13-Feb-2014

Correspondence Address:
Ayman Mahdy
Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, Director Voiding Dysfunction and Female Urology, University of Cincinnati, 231 Albert Sabin Way, ML 0589, Cincinnati
Ohio
Login to access the Email id


Rights and Permissions

How to cite this article:
Mahdy A. Interposition flaps in vesicovaginal fistula repairs can optimize cure rate. Urol Ann 2014;6:98

How to cite this URL:
Mahdy A. Interposition flaps in vesicovaginal fistula repairs can optimize cure rate. Urol Ann [serial online] 2014 [cited 2020 Sep 28];6:98. Available from: http://www.urologyannals.com/text.asp?2014/6/1/98/127036

In this chart review of vesicovaginal fistula (VVF) cases, the authors report their excellent results with the abdominal approach and use of omental (or peritoneal) flap interposition. There are many factors that would affect the choice of surgical approach in VVF. One of those factors is the surgeon's experience as the reader can tell from this study. In our experience, we found that most VVFs can be successfully repaired vaginally. With very few needed abdominal repair. This provides the obvious advantages of less blood loss and operative time, lower morbidity and shorter hospital stay. Although the use of tissue interposition is still feasible with vaginal approach, it is not always necessary. In case the abdominal approach is indicated (e.g., concomitant ureteral injury or indication for other abdominal procedures), one of the minimally invasive surgeries (laparoscopy, robotic.) can be pursued as an alternative to open surgery.

The authors defined success as "the absence of urinary leakage," there will be still some women who may have any of the different types of urethral incontinence even with successful fistula repair. VVF patients are even more vulnerable to urethral leakage since most of them have had hysterectomies and subsequent bladder traumas and repairs. These together may induce stress, urgency, or mixed urinary incontinence. These conditions are unrelated to the fistula itself and should not be counted as failure of fistula repair. Otherwise that might affect the overall success reported in the study.




 

Top
 
  Search
 
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
    Access Statistics
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  

 
  In this article

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1107    
    Printed43    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded175    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal