Urology Annals
About UA | Search | Ahead of print | Current Issue | Archives | Instructions | Online submissionLogin 
Urology Annals
  Editorial Board | Subscribe | Advertise | Contact
Users Online: 474   Home Print this page  Email this page Small font size Default font size Increase font size


 
Table of Contents
ABSTRACT
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 184-188  

Urology training


Date of Web Publication26-Apr-2016

Correspondence Address:
Login to access the Email id


Rights and Permissions

How to cite this article:
. Urology training. Urol Ann 2016;8, Suppl S2:184-8

How to cite this URL:
. Urology training. Urol Ann [serial online] 2016 [cited 2020 Jan 17];8, Suppl S2:184-8. Available from: http://www.urologyannals.com/text.asp?2016/8/6/184/181212

Challenge facing the urologist in Saudi Arabia in the future

K. E. Al Otaibi


Department of Urology, Riyadh Armed Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

There are 72 government hospitals in the Kingdom with Urology Departments. The private sector is not included in this study. Approximately 257 Urologists are employed in these hospitals - 22% of these are Saudi.

The waiting list for out-patients is approximately 3 months for patients to be seen by a Urologist (RKH figures).

Out of these 72 hospitals, 6 centres are performing renal transplants by Urologists and 2 other centres are using surgeons to perform the transplants.

The current population stands at 17 million and the ratio of Urologists to the population is 1:66,000. The population is expected to increase more than 39 million by the year 2020, and we will discuss the challenge facing the Urologist to cope with the demand in the future.

Presented at the: 11 th Saudi Urological Conference

King Fahd Military Medical Complex - Dhahran

24-26 February 1998 (27-29 Shawwal 1418)

The current status of urological training in Saudi Arabia

M. Abomelha, A. Fallatah, H. Mosli, N. Al Jawini, W. Al Khudair, A. Al Dayel, S. El Faqih


Department of Urology, Saudi Council for Health Specialty, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Introduction and Objective: Most of the practicing Urologists in the Kingdom have been trained abroad. The establishment of Saudi Board in Urology by the SCHS in 1994 had attracted many doctors to receive urological training locally. This paper present and discuss the current status of urology training in Saudi Arabia.

Methods: The structured training program in urology as well as the training facilities and training centers are presented and discussed.

Results: The Saudi Board in Urology (SBU) is a structured five years joint training program, which includes 15 months non-urological rotation. The remaining 45 months are allocated for pure urological training. The joint aspect of the program is fulfilled by spending one year in urological training in two other training centers outside the base hospital. The training objectives are to train and graduate competent knowledgeable Urologist capable of functioning independently. Trainees are required to complete the operative logbook, weekly tutorials and the three monthly evaluations and to pass the annual promotion examination. To enter the final board of examination, candidate should have passed the first board examination in addition to a successful training assessment.

Currently 54 trainees are enrolled at different levels in 17 training centers in the Kingdom. The ratio of trainee to trainers, beds and operative procedures are 1.8, 7, 365 respectively. The first batch of graduation of 5 Urologists was celebrated in January 2000.

Conclusion: In spite of the short experience in urology training in Saudi Arabia, the outcome so far is encouraging. We are going through an exciting transition period with a successful unique experience. This is attributed to the team spirit of participating training centers in addition to the managing role of the SCHS.

Presented at the: 15 th Saudi Urological Conference

King Fahd Hospital - Madinah Al Munawarah

7-9 May 2002 (24-26 Safar 1423)

Learning and teaching urology in native language (Arabic in my case)

Waled B. Nahas


Department of Urology, Damascus University, Damascus, Syria

Purpose: To present briefly the advantage of learning Medicine in Arabic, and different opinions about this subject.

Material and Methods:

Comprehensive review of published material about pros and cons

Survey of my personal experience during learning and teaching Medicine in Arabic in the pre and post graduate phases

General retrospective analysis of accumulated information through my teaching career and practicing of urology for over than thirty five years at Damascus Medical School gained from graduate act (behavior) and feedback information from them during their study, practice, specialization, and teaching.

Results and Conclusion:

Learning in Arabic has great advantage to the medical student. It enables him to understand easily the basic and medical knowledge, and add it to what he has learned in his pre-college education

A graduate from an Arabic teaching Medical School has better ability in dealing with Arab patients and communicating with local and regional colleagues

This graduate if he is prepared and educated properly will be a better teacher to Arabic medical students because of his ability to transfer all new development in medical field much easier and in a simple way

Teaching Medicine and Urology in Arabic has great advantage in the Arab States especially at the pre-graduate level if it is carried in a proper way by suitable people, and in a well established curriculum with emphasis on teaching terminology preferably in English which is very important to update and follow current references in Medicine and Urology.

Presented at the: 18 th Saudi Urological Conference

King Abdulaziz University Hospital

20-23 February 2006 (21-24 Muharram 1427)

Issues and controversies in urologic surgery training

Armen G. Aprikian


Division of Urology, The Montreal General Hospital and Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, Canada

The clinical practice of urology is continuously changing. The rapid development of new technologies and their implementation into clinical care require that surgical training programs become more adaptable to such changes.

With the surgical theatre becoming an increasingly more expensive are to manage it is becoming clear that significant parts of surgical training must occur outside the operating room. With the advent of modern surgical trainers, virtual reality simulators, tele-mentoring and dedicated wet-labs, trainees can become competent on basic surgical skills prior to joining the surgical theatre and thus improve efficiency. Similarly, as surgical staff adopts new techniques and pass through their learning curve, this strains the exposure of surgical trainees during the limited time of residency.

Although simple surgical logs are routinely used to measure trainee surgical exposure, the use of specialty-specific software and hand-held personal digital assistants (PDA's) can document full clinical and academic activities of urology residents in real-time. This tool has provided an objective assessment of resident experience as it relates to clinical case-mix and for addressing curriculum weaknesses. As such, program directors can track individual resident experience and progress and can institute adjustments in training as required.

In recent years there has been a realization that the skills required to provide effective and appropriate care go beyond specialized medical knowledge and surgical skills. In recognition of this, the RCPSC and the AOGME have broadened their training objectives to include not only the knowledge and skills required to become a specialist, but also a set of core competencies that emphasize the importance of managerial, communication and educational abilities. This change has been motivated by a perception that there is a lack of sensitivity to the importance of these aspects in current trainees and specialists. The CanMEDS outlines seven roles that specialist physicians should fulfill to meet overall needs, medical expert, communicator, collaborator, manager, health advocate, scholar and professional.

Finally, an area of debate exists over the need of a more flexible residency, focusing more on medical urology and the most common procedures and surgeries performed by practicing urologists. Extended residencies for those individuals desiring advanced training in surgical subspecialties or research would lengthen the residency and could lead to special certificates.

Presented at the: 18 th Saudi Urological Conference

King Abdulaziz University Hospital

20-23 February 2006 (21-24 Muharram 1427)

Urology training in Saudi Arabia: 10 years experience

Mohammed S. Abomelha, H. A. Mosli, S. T. Al Sharief, A. B. Fallatah, N. A. Al Jawini, H. Al Zahrani


Department of Urology, Riyadh Armed Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

The Saudi Board of Urology is a structured five years joint training program governed by the Saudi Council for Health Specialties (SCHS). The training objective is to train and graduate competent, knowledgeable urologist capable of functioning independently. Residents are required to complete the operative logbook, weekly tutorials, the three monthly evaluations and to pass the annual promotion examination. To enter the final board examination, candidate should have passed the Part-I exam in addition to a successful training assessment.

Currently, 50 trainees are enrolled at different levels in 18 training centers in the Kingdom. The average intake of residents is 10 each year. The ratio of trainee to trainers, beds and operative procedures are 1.8, 8, and 365, respectively. The first batch of graduation was celebrated in 1999 and since then 35 urologists were graduate with passing rate of final written of 74% and oral of 81%.

The majority of training slots were provided by MOH and MODA hospitals, 45% and 25% respectively. For that reason, 77% of graduates were from the two sectors.

During the past 4 years, the average graduation per year was 7 urologists. This rate is not going to make a big change to the need of urologists in the country. The present urology manpower in the country is operated by 330 urologists (ratio 1:66000 urologist/population), of whom 55% are expatriates. If we have to accommodate for the high growth rate of population (3.9%), the retirements and expatriate resignations, we need to improve the present training facilities, utilize better the existing training centers, and accredit more potential training centers. We need to plan to graduate 12 urologists per year and that could be achieved by doubling the present training slots.

Presented at the: 18 th Saudi Urological Conference

King Abdulaziz University Hospital

20-23 February 2006 (21-24 Muharram 1427)

Residency training program in urology Egyptian experience

Ahmed Kholy


Department of Surgery, Secretary General of High Committee Medical Specialties, Egypt

The Training Triangle:

Trainer

Trainee

Training Center.

Objectives of Training:

Knowledge

Skills

Attitude

Behavior.

On Job Training:

Clinical Skills

Log Book.

Hospital Scientific Activities:

Mandatory

Morning Meeting

Grand Round/Weekly.

Elective Arrange 3 Activities/Week

Lectures

J. Club

Case Presentations

Mortality Meetings

Interdepartmental Meetings

Quality Management

Infection Control Meetings.

Essential Basic Training: CPR and ATLS

Training Courses for Trainees:

Intensive courses are held for the trainees before the first and second part exams. In these courses, professors participate in the whole fundamental medical sciences and clinical majors

Clinical courses are held to prepare for the third part exam

Courses and workshops are held for the whole Egyptian Fellowship doctors on the treatment of emergency cases to train on the cardio-pulmonary main and advanced resuscitation CPR - ATLS - ACLS in the emergency care training centers

Training courses are held on the basic practical skills for each major (such as the surgery major in which intestinal anastomosis is trained).

Training Courses for Trainers and Examiners:

Intensive courses for the training of the trainers (TOT)

Examiners training courses (TOE) to explain the system of Objective Structured Clinical Exam (OSCE) in the clinical exams instead of personal evaluation

Appraisal courses on how to deal with the trainees' problems and their different characters.

Annual Evaluation System for Trainees:

This evaluation is performed by the professor supervisor and the trainer in cooperation with the coordinator, and the result of annual evaluation is sent to the Egyptian Fellowship to promote the trainee from the training year to the following one as follows:

A continuous evaluation of each trainee is made with regard of the monthly regularity, attending the shifts, lectures and all the required activities for training and completing the lob book in sequence

Local annual evaluation is made to transfer the trainees from a training year to the following one. The annual evaluating exam marks are distributed as follows:

30% of the mark on regularity in attending the scientific activities and shifts

30% for completing the log book

20% MCQ written exam

20% clinical and oral exam

According to what the scientific council of the specialty views.

The Program:

This is a structured program for training in Urology. It is a full time post-structured 5 years program

It includes education in basic sciences, clinical knowledge, technical skills and progressive maturity of urological management.

Primary Urological Training 24 months:

12 months in General Surgery including Plastic & Pediatric Surgery

3 months in Surgical Intensive Care including renal dialysis

3 months in Radiology

6 months in Urology.

Minimal Operative Requirement:

Performed himself (S) and assisted (A) in 600 operative procedures, as follows:

General Surgery 50 operations

Conventional Urology 180 operations (S 70, A 110)

Endo-Urology 370 operations (S 125, A 245).

Presented at the: 18 th Saudi Urological Conference

King Abdulaziz University Hospital

20-23 February 2006 (21-24 Muharram 1427)

How to write a medical original article: Advice from an author

Ahmed A. Shokeir


Department of Urology, Urology and Nephrology Center, Director of Renal Transplantation Unit, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt

Much has been done to improve medical writing. Editors reject ill-prepared scripts and attempt to improve those accepted. Referees provide detailed criticism of the content of papers submitted so that a journal retains its high standards in the face of the volume of work presented to it.

Yet, many authors find difficulty in placing a piece of writing which has taken much time and trouble to prepare and may contain work of importance. Doctors spend a deal of time with pen in hand. What they need is someone to help them express themselves clearly. The aim of the present lecture is to provide guidelines for the authors on how to increase their chances of manuscript acceptance. The review will focus on writing original articles only.

To write an original article successfully, there should be 3 essential requirements "basic triad of original article" including:

A subject worthwhile to report,

A knowledge of the basic structure of manuscript,

A knowledge of the essentials of mechanics of writing

Each of these items will be discussed in details.

Presented at the: 18 th Saudi Urological Conference

King Abdulaziz University Hospital

20-23 February 2006 (21-24 Muharram 1427)

Evolusion of urology training in Saudi Arabia

Mohammed S. Abomelha, Hassan M. Al Zahrani


Department of Urology, Advanced Medicine Center for Subspecialties, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

The year 1992 was a milestone in urology training in Saudi Arabia. In that year, two important events accelerated the local urology training: the launching of the Arab Board in Urology by the Arab Board for Medical Specializations and the establishment of the Saudi Commission for Health Specialties (SCFHS). The preparation to set up the urology training was a joint effort of the different health care providing institutions in the country. At an earlier stage, the foundation, structure, and regulations were designed and implemented by the pioneer urologist heading the Urology Departments in Riyadh, Jeddah, and Al Khobar.

In 1994, the Saudi Board of Urology enrolled the first group of urological trainees and the first batch of graduation of five urologists was celebrated in 1999. The Saudi Board of Urology is a structured five-year joint training program. The training's objective is to train and graduate competent, knowledgeable urologists, who are capable of functioning independently. During the training, the residents are required to complete their operative log book, weekly tutorials and a 3-monthly evaluation. To move to a higher training level, the resident has to pass the annual promotion examination. The requirement to proceed to the final board examination, the candidates should have passed the Part-I exam, in addition to successful training assessment.

Currently, 75 trainees are enrolled at different levels in 18 training centers. The majority of the training slots were provided by the Ministry of Health (MOH) and Ministry of Defence and Aviation (MODA), 45% and 25% respectively, and for that reason 68% of the graduates were from these two sectors. The average intake of residents is 15 each year. The ratio of trainee to trainers, beds and operative procedures are 1:1.8, 1:8, and 1:365 respectively. 65 urologists were graduated during the past 15 years, with an average passing rate of the final written exam of 70% and oral of 87%. During the past 5 years, the average graduation rate was 6 urologists per year. This rate is not going to make much on the demand of urologists in a country where still 70% of urologists are expatriates. The present urology manpower in Saudi Arabia is operated by around 600 urologists (ratio 1:40000 urologist/population), of whom 66% are urologists at specialist level. Of the 196 consultant urologists working all over the country, 49% are Saudi nationals. It is also of interest to mention that the majority of graduated Saudi Board Urologists choose to go for subspecialty training abroad. The local subspecialty training in pediatric urology started in 2006 and the first graduation of trainee was achieved in December 2009 following successful passing the final examination.

The Saudi urology training is a challenging and dynamic program, which needs to be evaluated and improved on a regular basis to meet the required number of Saudi urologists in the future. The years to come will witness substantial reform in urology training as has been planned by the training committee of the SCFHS.

Presented at the: 22 nd Saudi Urological Conference

King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre

15-18 March 2010

The learning environment of urology training in Saudi Arabia

Abdulrahman Babaeer, Abdullah Alkhayal, Saleh Bin Saleh


Department of Urology, King Abdulaziz Medical City and King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

There is a growing evidence that the environment in which residents learn influences the quality of learning outcome. Since the urology training in Saudi Arabia is a work-based learning, evaluation of this environment gives the training program insight into the educational functioning of clinical departments approved for the training. The Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM) is a validated questionnaire that evaluated the learning environment. It has 40 items that measure 3 subscales: perceptions of autonomy, perceptions of social support and perceptions of teaching.

Objectives: To assess the learning environment of urology residents in Saudi Arabia.

Methods: The PHEEM questionnaire was distributed hand-to-hand to urology residents attending the 22 nd Saudi Urology Conference in March 2010. It was sent afterwards as a link through e-mail to all the urology residents in Saudi Arabia in order to be completed online by those who did not attend the conference. All completed questionnaires were returned anonymous. Each item in the questionnaire is scored on a 5-point scale, where 1 = strongly disagree and 5 = strongly agree. A score more than 3 is considered satisfactory.

Results: Seventy-two residents were enrolled in the urology-training program in Saudi Arabia in the academic year 2010-2011. The response rate was 53% (38/72). Four of the responders were in their first year of training that consists of general surgery, so they were excluded from the analysis. The mean score for autonomy is 2.86. The mean score for the perception of social support is 2.99. The mean score for the perception of teaching is 2.98. The total mean score is 2.94.

Conclusion: The results of the survey show that urology residents in Saudi Arabia do not perceive their learning environment positively. Significant concerns should be addressed by the training program.

Presented at the: 23 rd Saudi Urological Conference

King Fahd Specialist Hospital - Dammam

21-24 February 2011




 

Top
 
  Search
 
    Similar in PUBMED
    Access Statistics
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  

 
  In this article

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed586    
    Printed21    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded123    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal