Urology Annals

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2014  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 340--345

Analysis of case series of milky urine: A single center and departmental clinical experience with emphasis on management perspectives: A prospective observational study


Sham Sunder, Rajesh Jayaraman, Himanshu Sekhar Mahapatra, Satyanand Sathi, K Venkataramanan, K Prabhu, Anurag Gupta, Suman Sethi 
 Department of Nephrology, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Rajesh Jayaraman
15/57, Second Floor, Old Rajinder Nagar, New Delhi - 110 060
India

Background: Milky urine can be due to chyluria or lipiduria due to nephrotic syndrome. Filarial chyluria usually responds to medical management while non-filarial cases may require surgical intervention. Aim: To perform a prospective observational study in patients presenting with milky urine in our centre over a period of one year from July 2011 to June 2012, a complete biochemical work up and imaging to find out the site of leakage of lymph if it is a case of chyluria, its response to medical management and the requirement of surgical intervention. Materials and Methods: Routine blood and urine investigations, 24 hour urine protein excretion, USG abdomen, serum lipid profile and rapid filarial antigen test were done in all. MRI abdomen was done in affordable patients. Renal biopsy was done in some chyluria patients for academic purpose and in milky urine with negative urine ether test. Sclerotherapy was done with 50% dextrose and 0.2% povidone iodine. Patients were followed up with 24 hour urine protein and triglyceride estimation. Results : 18 cases of milky urine were encountered. 8 were filarial chyluria, 9 non- filarial and 1 MCD. Mean urine TG level and median 24 hour urinary protein excretion were 37.2 ± 24.6 mg% and 4.96 g respectively. The mean age for filariasis (22.9 ± 4.5 years) was significantly different from that of non-filarial etiology (31.5 ± 4.8 years) (P = 0.005). The mean 24 hour urinary protein for normal MRI cases (4.64 ± 0.70 g) was significantly different from those with dilated lymphatics (8.15 ± 2.55 g) (P = 0.02). All the non- filarial and 4 filarial cases required sclerotherapy. One patient required a second sitting. Conclusion : Milky urine is most commonly due to chyluria and occasionally due to nephrotic syndrome. Nephrotic syndrome is managed in its own way while chyluria not amenable to pharmacological intervention is managed with sclerotherapy.


How to cite this article:
Sunder S, Jayaraman R, Mahapatra HS, Sathi S, Venkataramanan K, Prabhu K, Gupta A, Sethi S. Analysis of case series of milky urine: A single center and departmental clinical experience with emphasis on management perspectives: A prospective observational study.Urol Ann 2014;6:340-345


How to cite this URL:
Sunder S, Jayaraman R, Mahapatra HS, Sathi S, Venkataramanan K, Prabhu K, Gupta A, Sethi S. Analysis of case series of milky urine: A single center and departmental clinical experience with emphasis on management perspectives: A prospective observational study. Urol Ann [serial online] 2014 [cited 2019 Nov 18 ];6:340-345
Available from: http://www.urologyannals.com/article.asp?issn=0974-7796;year=2014;volume=6;issue=4;spage=340;epage=345;aulast=Sunder;type=0