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REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 141-148

Mini percutaneous nephrolithotomy in the treatment of renal and upper ureteral stones: Lessons learned from a review of the literature


Department of Urology, Endourology and Laparascopic Urology, Korgialenio Benakio Hellenic Red Cross Hospital, Athens, Greece

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Nikolaos Ferakis
Solomou 3, 15562 Cholargos, Athens
Greece
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DOI: 10.4103/0974-7796.152927

PMID: 25837662

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The aim of this review is to present the most recent data regarding the indications of mini percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL), the results and the complications of the method. Medline was searched from 1997 to January 2014, restricted to English language. The Medline search used a strategy including medical subject headings and free-text protocols. PCNL is a well-established treatment option for patients with large and complex renal calculi. In order to decrease morbidity associated with larger instruments like blood loss, postoperative pain and potential renal damage, a modification of the technique of standard PCNL has been developed. This is performed with a miniature endoscope via a small percutaneous tract (11-20 F) and was named as minimally invasive or mini-PCNL. This method was initially described as an alternative percutaneous approach to large renal stones in a pediatric patient population. Furthermore, it has become a treatment option for adults as well, and it is used as a treatment for calculi of various sizes and locations. However, the terminology has not been standardized yet, and the procedure lacks a clear definition. Nevertheless, mini-PCNL can achieve comparable stone-free rates to the conventional method, even for large stones. It is a safe procedure, and no major complications are reported. Although less invasiveness has not been clearly demonstrated so far, mini-PCNL is usually related to less blood loss and shorter hospital stay than the standard method.


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